This will not be welcome news for all the naysayers who say Alabama educators can’t walk and chew gum at the same time–but new info from the Public Affairs Research Council of Alabama says we are making great progress in graduation rates and preparing students for college and careers.

In 2012 when Tommy Bice was state superintendent, he and his staff put together Plan 2020 that tackled graduation and readiness rates.  This was guided by tons of feedback from both four-year and two-year colleges, business and industry and local school systems.

Here is the PARCA news release of September 23 that details what is happening:

“In 2012, the Alabama State Board of Education adopted Plan 2020, which embraced a vision for the state education system led by the motto: “Every child a graduate. Every graduate prepared.” The plan called for raising Alabama’s high school graduation rate to 90 percent, while at the same time producing graduates who are better prepared for college and the workplace. Since that time, significant progress occurred in raising the graduation rate from 72 percent in 2011 to 90 percent in 2018.

While the high graduation rate is laudable, state education leaders have raised concerns about the gap between the percent graduating and the percent prepared for college or work.

Significant progress has been made over the past three years:
In 2016, Alabama graduated 87 percent of its students, though only 66 percent were college and career ready.
In 2017, the gap closed, with 89 percent graduating and 71 percent college and career ready.
In 2018, improvement continued with 90 percent graduating and 75 percent college and career ready.

Though the gap is still large, it is improving.

Continuing to close that gap is vital. The state has a goal of adding 500,000 highly-skilled workers to the workforce by 2025. To meet that goal, virtually all high school graduates will need to be prepared for education beyond high school or prepared to enter the workforce directly after high school.

The 2018 CCR data shows:

Career Technical Education (CTE) certificates are the fastest-growing means for classifying students as college and career ready.

Qualifying scores on the ACT and WorkKeys assessments are the two most common measures used to classify students as college and career ready.

Systems and schools leverage different strategies for preparing students – reflecting varying strengths, resources, and goals for education.

Some systems are very strong in particular areas and weak in others, which may not meet the needs of all students.

The Alabama College and Career Strategic Plan (a component of Plan 2020) articulated a vision in which all Alabama students graduate high school college and career ready. The plan defines college and career readiness as:
“…a high school graduate [that] has the English and mathematics knowledge and skills necessary to either (1) qualify for and succeed in entry-level, credit-bearing college courses without the need for remedial coursework, or (2) qualify for and succeed in the postsecondary job training and/or education necessary for their chosen career (i.e. technical/vocational program, community college, apprenticeship or significant on-the-job training).”

High school graduates are classified as college and career ready (CCR) if they meet at least one of the following criteria.
Score college ready in at least one subject on the ACT
Score at the silver level or above on the WorkKeys Assessment
Earn a passing score on an Advanced Placement or International Baccalaureate Exam (college-level courses delivered in high schools)
Successfully earn a Career Technical Education credential
Earn dual enrollment credit at a college or university
Successfully enlist in the military”