Selective Indignation

The last few days have truly been one of those times when we don’t know whether to laugh or cry.

The quandary is the result of recordings that clearly show the governor had a relationship with a female on his “leadership team” that overstepped the normal bounds of strictly a work relationship.  The “Keystone Kops” routine of all who responded was amateurish and totally unconvincing and quickly fed the ever-present appetite of those national media types who delight in showing the world that “bumpkin” is much too high praise for anyone from Alabama.

So once again we hung our heads and wondered why those we elect to office can not remember that they are not invisible–as much as they might wish to be.

The urge to laugh (at least to me) comes from all those who rise in righteous indignation demanding that someone resign or someone be impeached–but have chosen to remain silent while the Speaker of the House remains in office while facing trial for 23 counts of felony. How in God’s name are we supposed to take someone seriously who can’t see the hypocrisy in their own words?

And why should we pay attention to their chest-beating and pontificating when they chose to never say a word about things that truly are deserving of indignation?

For instance:

Where is their bully pulpit when we divert $66 million from the Education Trust Fund so that we can offer tax breaks to big corporations and scholarships to less than 4,000 children in this state all under the guise of helping poor children?  Where is their indignation when we take $66 million from 730,000 students in public schools to benefit only a handful of others?

When we pass the Alabama Accountability Act and tell 400 students in Lowndes County that help is on the way when, in fact, that is untrue, where are those voices crying for justice?

How does an Alabama think tank call for a governor to step down for betraying the people when the week before they testify in favor of the RAISE/PREP bill that betrays thousands and thousands of educators?

When principal Debbie Deavours at Berry Elementary in Fayette County has to hold fund-raisers to pay their school’s phone bill, where are the cries that something is amiss?

When retired educators, who laid the foundation for Alabama’s future, have not received an increase in their retirement check in a decade, where are those saying, “This is not right?”

I have no problem with indignation, as anyone who reads these pages knows.  But I do have a problem when it seems more directed toward garnering headlines than being truly concerned about issues that really count.

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